New Hampshire Lawmakers Introduce Adult-Use Cannabis Legalization Bill
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New Hampshire Lawmakers Introduce Adult-Use Cannabis Legalization Bill

The legislation would legalize the possession of up to an ounce of cannabis for personal use, as well as the home cultivation of up to three mature plants.

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November 1, 2021

New Hampshire lawmakers have introduced legislation to legalize adult-use cannabis.

The bill, sponsored by Rep. Tim Egan, would legalize the possession of up to an ounce of cannabis for personal use, as well as the home cultivation of up to three mature plants, according to a WCAX report.

“At the end of the day, if it does become a business—and it should—states like New Hampshire, who have struggled to find revenue for education or mental health care, can say, in our taxation of cannabis, a percentage for that is going to go for these issues,” Egan told the news outlet.

Legalization has bipartisan support in the Legislature due to the economic benefits of a commercial cannabis market, Egan added, and a study by the University of New Hampshire has revealed that 75% of residents support adult-use legalization, WCAX reported.

Republican Gov. Chris Sununu has historically opposed legalization.

“One thing I’m really trying to do is look at what has worked and what hasn’t worked,” he told WCAX. “We have been very successful with our doorway system and how we address substance misuse in this state. It’s going really well. Again, we just want to collect the data, understand the pushes and pulls, the pros and cons, and work with the Legislature to hopefully find the best solution.”

Egan’s bill will be sent to committee once the Legislature reconvenes in January, WCAX reported.

During New Hampshire’s 2020 legislative session, the House passed a similar adult-use legalization bill that would have legalized the possession and limited cultivation of cannabis.

RELATED: New Hampshire Takes Criminal Justice Approach to Cannabis Legalization: Legalization Watch

The bill ultimately stalled in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic, however.