Michigan Businesses May Be Able to Apply for Standalone Adult-Use Cannabis Licenses Starting Nov. 1
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Michigan Businesses May Be Able to Apply for Standalone Adult-Use Cannabis Licenses Starting Nov. 1

The Marijuana Regulatory Agency is considering removing a requirement that businesses must hold a medical cannabis license to apply for an adult-use permit.

August 6, 2020

Editor's Note: This article was updated at 9:15 a.m. on Monday, Aug. 17 to clarify that the Michigan Regulatory Agency has not yet officially approved the change allowing non-medical cannabis business license holders to apply for adult-use licenses.

Michigan’s Marijuana Regulatory Agency is considering removing a requirement that businesses must hold a medical cannabis business license to apply for an adult-use permit, meaning that entrepreneurs would be able to apply for standalone adult-use cannabis licenses starting Nov. 1, according to a Benzinga report.

The Michigan Regulation and Taxation of Marihuana Act of 2018, which legalized adult-use cannabis in the state, included provisions that barred non-medical cannabis license holders from entering the adult-use market until 2021, Benzinga reported, in an effort to give a competitive advantage to the operators who had developed the state’s medical cannabis industry.

The legislation offered the Marijuana Regulatory Agency the option to remove these provisions after one year, and Andrew Brisbo, the agency’s executive director, told Benzinga that industry stakeholders and regulators are considering opening the market up to non-medical cannabis licensees in an effort to address social equity issues and promote the creation of equity programs.